Slavery and Self-Esteem

1851 Words Jun 25th, 2018 8 Pages
Self-esteem Self-esteem is a term used to describe self-evaluation. The term self-evaluation is used to express that self-esteem is a product of personal reflection. A person with a high self-esteem has positive self-regard while a person with low self-esteem has negative self-regard. Self-esteem can be impacted by several external factors and is most impacted in the childhood years. Individuals who feel respected in their childhood are more likely to develop high self-esteem. Signs of respect include being listened to and being given attention. Such actions make a child feel loved and valued. Children who are exposed to more disrespectful actions like abuse, or harsh criticism are more likely to develop a low self-esteem. The formation …show more content…
The late 20th century demonstrated a shift from the belief in racial taxonomy. The essence of this shift is perfectly communicated by Gloria A. Marshall in her statement, “there can be little or no justification for the continued use of the race concept. ” She made this bold statement as evidence was found that indicated that the finite classifications of different racial groups were not finite after all. Marshall argues that labeling race as a species subcategory is obsurd because the human population cannot possibly show any evolutionary splits. This belief is based on the fact that groups of humans were not separated in such a way that they were “exposed to different evolutionary forces and events under complete or effective genetic isolation. ” If this is no true species subcategory for Homo sapiens then, what is race? It’s fictitious, entirely manmade according to many researcher of the late 20th century.
The idea that race is a social construct is supported by the simple fact that the races that people think they can visually identity do not necessarily have any biological elements that can confirm the validity of that identity. But, still we use race a primary identifier. Such biological identifiers that mimic, but are not supported

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