Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, And Other Specific Sleeping Disorders

1872 WordsApr 27, 20168 Pages
abuse, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, and other specific sleeping disorders. Medication use for sleep was not an exclusion criteria. Of the participants, 239 were eligible for randomization; 119 were assigned to the CBTI group, and 120 were assigned to the TAU group. The participants in the TAU group were more likely to be female, not White, and unemployed than the participants in the CBTI group. With regard to sleeping baseline, the participants in TAU had slightly poorer baseline sleeping patterns and were more likely to be on sleeping medications; they also had a much longer history of insomnia (Cape et al., 2016). The participants in the CBTI group had to attend five weekly 90-minute group treatment sessions. The groups were comprised of 5–15 participants. The intervention followed a treatment manual that had been used in three previous treatment trials. It included educational materials about sleep and the key CBT for insomnia components, which included sleep restriction, stimulus control, relaxation training, and cognitive strategies. The participants in the TAU group received routine individual treatment for insomnia, which was provided in primary care settings. Routine individual treatments could be from a mental health practitioner or a CBT therapist. The results showed that participants in the CBTI group had better sleeping outcomes post-treatment than those in the TAU group. There were smaller effects at 20 weeks. In addition, there were not significant differences

More about Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, And Other Specific Sleeping Disorders

Open Document