Smallpox Bioterrorism and Emergency Management Essay

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Bioterrorism has been on the forefront of consideration since the bombing of the twin towers in New York City, on September 11, 2001. Specifically smallpox a considered biological weapon may be used to cause mass destruction. The last naturally acquired case of smallpox in the world occurred in 1977, consequentially we have stopped vaccination and those under 30 have little immunity to smallpox (Ford, 2003). Initial symptoms include high fever, fatigue, head and backaches, death which may occur in up to 30% of cases and an incubation period in about 12 days (range: 7 to 17 days) following exposure (Ford, 2003). Military regard smallpox as a means for enemies to use an unconventional tactic to gain advantage having been used most likely …show more content…
A Public Health Emergency Response Guide for State, Local and Tribal Directors is an all-hazards reference tool for health professional who are responsible for initiating the public health response during the first 24 hours (i.e., the acute phase) of an emergency or disaster (CDC, 2009). As this assures an appropriate protocol during mass confusion and provides clear and concise instruction.

Resources for a disastrous event require a defined set of resource which must be identified and communicated to the community at large. Funds are from a composite of sources to include the federal government, local and state agencies. Key preparedness elements for terrorism response: Hazard Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, Health Surveillance and Epidemiologic Investigation, Laboratory Diagnosis and Characterization, and Consequence Management all require financial consideration and community discussion. (CDC, 2009) Clearly difficult economic periods must be cautious to secure such funding.

Collaboration is a key factor in agencies and officials working together with a central focus on planning. As with the overall planning process, development of enhanced surveillance and epidemiologic protocols requires collaboration among appropriate public health partners (CDC, 2001). Communication is a central theme to avoid error which may be over looked during crisis. There are many…