Social And Feminist International Relations Theory

1766 Words May 12th, 2016 8 Pages
Although identity plays an essential part in our sense of belonging and how we define whom we are, this essay will argue how viewing identity as essential, primary and cohesive causes a hierarchy between societal groups, which has affected a plethora of conflicts in global politics. Therefore it is important that we move away from thinking about identity in these ways to understand how identities are socially constructed and inherently dynamic and non-binary. From the perspective of Feminist International Relations theory, and employing the concept of intersectionality and the works of post-modern feminist international relations theorists, Judith Butler, Ann Tickner, and Christine Sylvester will be used to support my argument from the approach of gender identity. I will first define identity and gender, and how they relate to global politics and feminist international relations theory. I will then introduce specific concepts of post-modern feminist international relations theory and intersectionality. Finally, the case studies of conflicts where the nature of women is predetermined by their constructed, binary gender such as, women combatants in the military, women in the Viet Cong during the Vietnam War, will be used to illustrate the flaws of gender hierarchies caused by viewing identity as essential, primary and cohesive and how this can affect global politics. Therefore, it is important that we move away from a sense of identity as essential, primary and cohesive to…
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