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Social Class Structures

Decent Essays
Primarily, the social class structures in the United States attaches descriptions of and distinctions between individuals based on the roles and status people hold at any given moment and subsequently judge accordingly. However, descriptions of statuses and roles in society are relatively provisional since the structure of any society is to adapt and evolve continuously. A profession (achieved status) that was once highly respected can now be regarded with contempt; an individual’s gender (ascribed status) once dictated how one should behave by societal standards (prescribed role), now is disregarded and reformed. Therefore, even though in America, there are no formal, enforced social class structures in place, social stratification,…show more content…
Unsurprisingly, it has proven to be complicated to live in a devoutly religious and predominately Caucasian community as a person who is not only struggling with their faith but also as a person of color; it can become a very isolating situation quite quickly. Additionally, it is unambiguous that the members of my community engage in in-groups and out-groups to class groups—especially groups of religion. As stated by Basirico, Cashion, and Eshleman (2014), in-groups form social units in which establishes boundaries meant to separate those who belong from those who don’t; thereby making individuals part of the out-group feel inferior. Consequently, an in-group’s mentality often attaches preconceived notions about out-groups to which may generate misconceptions, prejudices, and egregious stereotypes (Basirico, Cashion, & Eshleman, 2014). These kinds of assumptions affect human beings and can either support or hinder one’s self-concept and sense of social belongingness. For example, in my community, there are religious stratifications that provoke not only variously gratuitous conflict but also religious segregation and exclusion. Moreover, religious debates often become political, and it goes without saying that I am now a firm believer in
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