Social Difference in Too Kill a Mockingbird

1277 WordsMay 15, 20086 Pages
Social differences have changed incredibly in the last decades. The world has known an evolution that no one could have predicted. Aspects such as racism, social class and individual perception have differed drastically and now represent a modern open-minded world. The multiculturism boost our country and our world has known has brought a new wave of cultural, racial and social differences. The world has changed for the better and communities as well as individuals are now more open to differences in others. In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, the subject of social differences is the main theme for the book. The book adresses directly the major problem of racism per example and deals with it in it's special way. Set in the 1930's, To…show more content…
Many times, we tend to think of racism as white against black but racism can certainly go the other way. This statement proves that the African American of Maycomb has accepted the fact that racism is present in their community as they are actually contributing to it by questioning the presence of the children at First Purchase. Today, religion is seen as a choice and not an obligation. Citizens are free to choose the religion they believe in or they choose to not believe in anything. Social class and social differences do not play as an important role than it used to be. People have become well aware and more open-minded to these kinds of factors. In like manner, in the novel, Mr. Dolphus Raymond uses alcoholism as an excuse to explain the fact that he has an engagement with a black woman and has children with her : " 'You mean all you drink in that sack's Coca-Cola? Just plain Coca-Cola?' … 'Some folks don't – like the way I live.' " This statement proves that the social differences and social class were very important factors on someones life, unlike today. With the multicultarulism boost that our world is experiencing today, more and more people are marrying people from differents races which contributes to our diverse communities. How can children and teenagers learn the correct values our society needs when we force them to study outdated material that represent values that are unacceptable today? Thirdly, trials are treated
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