Social Interaction Patterns

1801 Words Nov 10th, 2013 8 Pages
Social Setting Project

Introduction:

For this specific project, I conducted observations at three high end franchise coffee shops; I will not be referring to the names of the individual stores throughout my report, as I have collaborated my findings. For the purposes of reader understanding and introduction, the names of the different coffee factories I observed were: Starbucks, Timothy’s World Coffee, and Second Cup. The purpose of the observations was to document what kind of social interactions are going on in a typical coffee shop, interactions that to the naked eye, seem to be normal. I will explain in this report that these social interactions that are occurring in different coffee shops, are meant to take place.

Method:
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People that were interacting with each other almost had a form of tunnel vision, like they were living in their own mileux, with no regard to the atmosphere they were inhibiting. I used the participant observation method, to much of the patrons and staff; I looked like a regular customer doing homework on my laptop. In order to play the part of a “fly on the wall” I did purchase a coffee at every observation, the thought of sitting down in a coffee shop by myself without purchasing anything seemed a little odd to me, then again, maybe that is how it is meant to feel.

Results of the Field Research: a) To my surprise, the settings of all of these coffee shops were relatively the same. Yes there were differences, but mostly in the age of the people working there or frequenting the establishment, other than those couple of things-everything was generally the same. The list of similarities versus the difference is totally skewed toward similarities. I think it would be harder for an observer to pick out the differences of these franchises rather than their similarities. First let’s discuss the companies’ logos themselves. Each one of the companies uses colors and text script that says something about their atmosphere. Each logo uses soothing earthy tones, or colors and script that are cognitively associated with good memories for the average consumer. By nothing else; the logo invites you into the store. Upon entering the stores, you are bombarded by the
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