Social Status Of Women In Ancient Rome

1761 Words8 Pages
Augustus was the oldest Rome Emperor, who claimed to be the "Restorer of the Republic." He was a monogamist and believed in chastity and virtues. To keep the society in line with his crafted culture, he enacted several reforms meant to streamline both moral and political lives of the Roman Kingdom. Subsequently, the ruler formed a new government and lifestyle for everybody within the entity. The impact of this legislation on women defined the gender roles that were supposed to be followed by the people. This paper discusses the statement: "The social position of women in ancient Rome improved as a result of the Augustan legislation on marriage and childbirth."
The most significant tool used by Augustus was religion. He wanted the local people to observe the tenets encompassed in the spiritual beliefs strictly. The rationale was to uphold the morals in aspects such as marriage. For instance, the ruler
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Notably, “many books on ‘women in antiquity’ either ignore the legal sources or present them sketchily and inaccurately, providing little in the way of context” (Grubs 2002). Ideally, the ancient sources that are available were mostly written by men, and may, therefore, fail to paint the real picture of what it was to be a wife, mother, daughter, or sister during the reign of the "Restorer of the Republic." Several questions can help researchers learn the social life of women in the Roman Empire. First of all, what were their distinct roles, if they had any? Did they have freedoms and privileges as the rest of residents? Did the patriarchal system bind them? Predictably, there are some difficulties in attempting to uncover the answers, but if a scholar manages to get them, he/she should be in a position to explain the subject. The best place to start is to understand how women benefited from the Augustan
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