Society's Sexism in the Yellow Wall-Paper

1109 WordsOct 8, 19995 Pages
Signs of society's sexism in The Yellow Wall-Paper The Yellow Wallpaper is a story, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Although the work is short, it is one of the most interesting works in existence. Gilman uses literary techniques very well. The symbolism of The Yellow Wall-Paper, can be seen and employed after some thought and make sense immediately. The views and ideals of society are often found in literary works. Whether the author is trying to show the ills of society of merely telling a story, culture is woven onto the words. The relationship between the narrator and her husband would be disagreeable to a modern woman's relationship. Today, most women crave equality with their partner. The reader never learns the name of the…show more content…
The room and many of it's features twist the common comforts of a home. The room itself used to be a nursery, which is ironic since the narrator was sent to the house to recover from post partum depression. The narrator comments: "The window typically represents a view of possibilities. However, for the narrator it represents a view of a world that she can not be a part of. The window is physically barred as she is barred from the world physically and mentally. The bed is nailed down. The bed should be a place of comfort for a couple, not a place where one partner is forced into a life that she does not want to live in that way. As, the title of the work shows, there is obviously something interesting to the narrator about the wallpaper. The stripes in the print of the wallpaper represent bars and the narrator begins to see a figure behind them: "The front pattern does move—and no wonder! The woman behind shakes it. Sometimes I think there are a great many women behind, and sometimes only one," (30). While the woman behind the bars shakes them, the narrator can not shake the bars that keep her away from reality. The woman represents the narrator as well as women in general and the movement for women's rights. The narrator also can represent any woman and the struggle that woman went though to get closer to achieving equality. John's

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