Socratic Creed vs. Plato's Theory of Knowledge

2206 Words Apr 23rd, 2013 9 Pages
The Synonymy of Truths and Ideas

Allyson Hansen

Introduction to Philosophy
Mark Eleveld
13 March, 2013

Allyson Hansen
Mark Eleveld
Introduction to Philosophy
13 March, 2013
The Synonymy of Truths and Ideas A modern philosopher studies “the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality and existence” according to the Free Online Dictionary and many Americans. However, if you asked a philosopher to define the word ‘philosopher,’ he or she might say that a philosopher is a lover of wisdom. The word philosophy itself is derived from the Greek word φιλοσοφία, or philosophia using the English alphabet. The word philosophia translates directly to mean “love of wisdom.” Philosophers believed and continue to believe that the whole mind must be
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Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John wrote parables, which are not absolutely known to be factual or fictional, in which they attempt to teach Jesus’ lessons. Like Plato, none of them were actually witnesses to any of the events they wrote about. Plato writes dialogues, instead of parables, in which his character Socrates to teach Socratic philosophy, and to teach some philosophy that wasn’t truly Socratic. “Plato uses the literary character of Socrates in many of his writings to present ideas that go well beyond anything that the historical Socrates said or believed. (Encyclopædia Britannica). He uses Socrates to express his own ideas as well as those of Socrates. Plato, like any other writer, shapes his writing in such a way that his own point is portrayed. One of Plato’s dialogues, The Apology, is the story—not a direct transcript, but Plato’s rendering—of Socrates’ trial by the state, in which Socrates is the only voice. His accusers are Meletus, a poet, Anytus, a laborer and a politician, and Lycon, an orator. As aforementioned, Socrates is seen as a threat by the state and has a reputation in Athens as a result of his different ways of thinking and his claiming to be the wisest person in Athens. Two parts of the Socratic creed are revealed even before any accusations can be made against Socrates. The oracle in Delphi had told Socrates that he was the wisest (Redfield par. 20e), and Socrates uses this fact in an attempt to defend his reputation.