Solitary Confinement Units

1172 Words Jun 22nd, 2018 5 Pages
The Pennsylvania system constructed in the early 1800s inspired solitary confinement by using extreme isolation to deter future crime. In the twentieth century, inmates in solitary confinement would stay for short periods. According to Craig, people would stay in secure housing units for a couple of days or weeks (Weir, 54). Nowadays solitary confinement has become very popular. Inmates are being sent to solitary confinement for indefinite periods of time ranging from weeks to years. An Urban Institute survey of self-identified supermax wardens reported 44 states with at least one facility relatively housing 25,000 prisoners (Arrigo and Bullock, 2008). Additionally, it is believed that as prisons are being overpopulated, the numbers …show more content…
If prisoners are threatening to the rest of the society, they need to be separated. Americans believe in retributive justice, where the criminal has to pay for their crime. The used of solitary confinement imposes the security and safety of all inmates and staff when they decide to refuse authority. However, correctional officers by sending inmates for lengthy sentence misuse these values.
There are numerous ethical issues regarding solitary confinement ranging from no resources to mental and physical harm. Most of the inmate population eventually goes back to society. Those who were in solitary confinement receive no resources from the correctional facility. A prisoner recently release from prison needs all the help they can get to survive on their own. However, such resources being taken away, increases the chances of recidivism. What seems to be everlasting isolation for such prisoners causes psychotic illnesses. Long-term segregation is often used among correctional facilities causing higher risk of mental illness symptoms (Arrigo and Bullock, 2008). Isolation in such narrow spaces conflicts the mind into being afraid of other human beings. Prisoners prolonged sentences in solitary confinement get used to being by themselves and forget how to react with others. As mental harm wasn’t enough, correctional officers tend to abuse their power. Their abusiveness comes from
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