Souls Of Black Folk Analysis

2004 Words9 Pages
precautions against the wicked arts and evil enticements of the notorious Pamphile, the wife of Milo, who say is your host” (Apuleius 21). Despite his aunt’s warning, Lucius choses to ignore her and the many others who inform him about the dangers of magic. Lucius is motivated by his own self-will which allows his curiosity to overcome him, enabling him to ignore the advice from others. His immaturity in this respect is what leads to him transitioning into an ass. His journey into an ass is not the only imperfection within society. Lucius gets beaten, driven to exhaustion, and witnesses a range of stories dealing with sexism, murder, evil, seduction, fraud, and moral corruptness. The world Lucius lived in, just like the world we live in today…show more content…
These texts displayed some of the most powerful and disturbing messages which ignited monumental changes in society, many sharing a common theme of oppression. In Souls of Black Folk, Du Bois addresses two very important concepts, the veil and double consciousness. He talks about his own experience growing up behind the veil and how it affected his life. These two terms highlight the many hardships African Americans faced including racism, white supremacy, and lack of education. However, Du Bois proclaims those hardships are still in existence today, “the problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color-line” (DuBois 41). Here, DuBois engages questions of race, racial domination, and racial exploitation. On one hand this text calls our nation’s attention to the gross inequities of power, wealth, opportunity, and access between whites and the majority of the world. Yet, on the other hand it also shows oppression the other majority of our world faces, and the impact our actions have had and will continue to have on society and…show more content…
In a moment, with almost prophetic intuition, the reality was revealed to us: we had reached the bottom. It is not possible to sink lower than this; no human condition is more miserable than this, nor could it conceivably be so. Nothing belongs to us anymore; they have taken away our clothes, our shoes, even our hair; if we speak, they will not listen to us, and if they listen, they will not understand. They will even take away our name: and if we want to keep it, we ill have to find ourselves the strength to do so, to manage somehow so that behind the name something of us, of us as we were, still remains.” (Levi
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