Essay about South Africa and the Native´s Land Act

540 Words 3 Pages
South Africa has been plagued with issues concerning land, poverty and inequality for decades. The connections between these issues throughout history have not only had an affect on the contemporary state of the country itself but also on South Africa in a global context.
100 years since the implementation of the Natives’ Land Act and 20 years since the end of Apartheid, land redistribution, according to the land reform program of 1994, has largely failed. The Natives’ Land Act was passed on June 19th, 1913, in an effort to regulate the acquisition of land by the ‘natives,’ meaning the black people, of South Africa. The act declared that the majority of South African land was reserved for the white minority, while only 7.3% of
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South Africa has been plagued with issues concerning land, poverty and inequality for decades. The connections between these issues throughout history have not only had an affect on the contemporary state of the country itself but also on South Africa in a global context.
100 years since the implementation of the Natives’ Land Act and 20 years since the end of Apartheid, land redistribution, according to the land reform program of 1994, has largely failed. The Natives’ Land Act was passed on June 19th, 1913, in an effort to regulate the acquisition of land by the ‘natives,’ meaning the black people, of South Africa. The act declared that the majority of South African land was reserved for the white minority, while only 7.3% of agricultural land was delegated to the ‘natives’ who composed 67% of the population. As the first significant act of segregation legislation in South Africa’s history, the Natives’ Land Act also put restrictions on the purchasing of land for both whites and blacks. While ‘native’ black people were prohibited from owning or buying land in the white reserves, and vice versa, blacks could reside within the white reserves if they could prove they were under white employment. This facet of the act forced many black sharecroppers, who were within white reserves, into wage labor on mines and white farms. At the time, however, there was opposition to the act by the South African Native National Congress, which was formed in 1912, and would later be
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