Special Needs: Parenting a Child with High Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome

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Running head: SPECIAL NEEDS: PARENTING A CHILD Special Needs: Parenting a Child with High Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome San Jose State University Introduction Parents who have children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) should define their parenting technique more so than parents of neurotypical children. Children with ASD have many different needs. For example, an ASD child has great difficulties with their social skills; this deficiency causes them not to have meaningful social interactions. Their interests are narrow, and it dominates the child's life (Volkmar & Klin, 2000, as cited in Sansosti & Powell-Smith, 2006). Asperger's syndrome or high functioning autistic children are under a special category. The…show more content…
Gray (2003) states that even among dual income couples, women still do the housework and take care of the children. With the added special needs child it put more pressure and stress on the women. They are the ones that make and take the child to medical appointments, social class, and talk to the school officials when there is a need. Unfortunately, the women will give up their career in order to manage the family. At the same time they are starting a new career, to become a better advocate and how to gain more knowledge about their child's disability. This type of stress on the couple often ends in divorce. The divorce rates in these families are over 80% in the United States (Center for Disease Control, 2002, as cited in Sansosti & Powell-Smith, 2006). T. Atwood (personal communication, October 14, 2006) "...it is not the child's disability that handicaps and disintegrates families; it is the way they react to it and to each other" (Dickman & Gordon, 1985 as cited by Atwood). Binger (2006) states those teaching and guiding children is perhaps the greatest concern that parents have and they want to do their best to teach behaviors, values and beliefs. Parents need to be assertive, but not intrusive and restrictive. They should be more supportive rather than punitive (Eastin, Greenber, & Hofschire, 2006). Limitations and areas for further investigation Cashin (2004)

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