Speech Analysis: The Declaration of War on Japan Essay

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On December 7, 1941, the Japanese Empire bombarded the US military base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in a surprise attack. This ambush reminded the U.S. that they could no longer be spectators of the war and engaged them into direct conflict during World War II. On the day after the attack, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt spoke before a joint session of the Congress, requesting for a declaration of war against Japan. Throughout his infamous speech, he utilised diction, literary devices, and his simple organization of text to urge the Congress to formally declare war on Japan and rally the American population to support the war effort, thus establishing a sense of urgency and strengthening the nation in the face of grave danger. …show more content…
On December 7, 1941, the Japanese Empire bombarded the US military base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in a surprise attack. This ambush reminded the U.S. that they could no longer be spectators of the war and engaged them into direct conflict during World War II. On the day after the attack, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt spoke before a joint session of the Congress, requesting for a declaration of war against Japan. Throughout his infamous speech, he utilised diction, literary devices, and his simple organization of text to urge the Congress to formally declare war on Japan and rally the American population to support the war effort, thus establishing a sense of urgency and strengthening the nation in the face of grave danger.

Each and every word his prominent speech played on the emotions of the American population and provided remarkable support for his purpose. Roosevelt initiated his persuasion with his choice of emotionally charged words to ignite polarizing emotional appeals. He emphasized the deception involved the attack through the numerous repetitions of the word "deliberately" and "premeditated". Furthermore, his usage of the words "hostility", "dastardly", and "infamy" demonizes the Japanese people and entices the attention of his intended audience, both the Congress and all American citizens. His mention of the American casualties and infrastructure of the US navy during the Pearl Harbor attack united the nation under an ideology of patriotism and
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