St. Paul 's Cathedral

1757 Words8 Pages
London is a city that is steeped in rich history and has many cultural influences that have affected everything from the way that Londoners speak down to the architecture. One of the most influential buildings in this time is one that dominated the London skyline as a reference point for 300 years up until the 1960’s, and that is Wren’s St. Paul’s Cathedral. This building has been recorded to be in existence on its site as early as the 604, but it could have been around as early as the 400’s. St. Paul’s has endured many things throughout its time, but none as disastrous as the Great Fire in 1666. This event, which almost destroyed the whole town of London, but the entire church as well, created a design opportunity for the aspiring architect Christopher Wren. With a huge path of destruction carved out for the fire, the city was looking for an architect to help them restore their city, but with a new style. Wren was provided with the chance to do over 50 churches in London, which St. Paul’s is his most prominent and remembered design. It is his design that is what decorates the London skyline and extends up 365 feet into the sky, and is one of the greatest examples of acoustics inside of a building. This essays goal is to explore the effect of the Great Fire in the design of this buildings current look, as well as explore the various designs of the domes and the interesting phenomenon which is the Whispering Gallery.
St. Paul’s Cathedral is an extremely old cathedral which

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