Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

1854 WordsJul 13, 20188 Pages
Stanley Kubrick’s 1964 film Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb presents a satire of the Cold War and nuclear warfare. The film stars comedian Peter Sellers in three different roles, including the president, a Royal Air Force officer, and the title character of Dr. Strangelove—a character who does not play a major role in the action until the final scene of the film. The film itself was adapted by Stanley Kubrick, Peter George, and Terry Southern from George’s thriller novel Red Alert and was originally intended to be a drama, but was made into a satirical black comedy in the writing process (Webster 33). In the final scene, the leaders of the American government are gathered in the War Room awaiting…show more content…
Additionally, he combines pathos and logos in addressing the president’s fear of deciding who would be taken into the mine shafts by saying that a computer would be necessary to make this decision. Despite all the scientific reasoning in his argument, what seems to be very effective in the argument is the strong appeal of the sex ratio of ten women—who have been chosen for their “highly stimulating sexual appeal”—to every one man. He presents this argument in a very logical and unassuming sense, saying that it will be a “sacrifice” and referring to the sexual acts as a form of “service”. This pathos-based argument of sexual interest is what causes General Turgidson to start arguing for the use of these mine shafts. General Turgidson’s argument relies far more on strategic thinking from the “military point of view” that emotionally appeals with pathos to the president using Cold War tensions and this new “mine shaft race”. He begins his argument in a lower register talking directly talking to the president, appealing to his fear of further Soviet-United States clashes that could spring up after they emerge from the mine shafts, which was brought to his attention after the Soviet ambassador compliments Dr. Strangelove on his idea for human survival. His use of slang with the word “Ruskies” ties directly into the fear of Soviet dominance over America. This also points to General Turgidson’s strong

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