Stereotypes

1401 Words Jul 8th, 2018 6 Pages
Those who deny biological advantages for either sex are flying in the face of scientific evidence (Moir and Moir 2000, p118.) Ensuring equality between men and women is taking on a new appearance. As we mature as a culture and continue to strive for the rights of citizens to become truly equal in the social context of our lives, regardless of race or gender (religion has a lot further to go in this area), we are presented with new obstacles to overcome. Sure, as adult citizens we may feel that there is equal opportunity available to all, but unless we have had an upbringing and education that has provided the right platform from which we can develop to our potentials, these opportunities are merely a front for equality. When analysed …show more content…
An irreparable fracture with this argument is that, any attempt to change the gender preferences of offspring in an attempt to break the gender mould (therefore creating opportunities through behaviour modification away from the "sex-stereotype"), simply does not work. We have seen that the mindset of the modern parent has come full circle from that which existed only a generation ago. In an attempt to combat societies influence on the development of our children, post-modernist parents try to offer their kids toys and experiences that have generally been limited to their sisters or brothers. It would seem on the surface that these changes could only diversify opportunities for the children lucky enough to have parents as forward thinking as this, but on closer inspection, could we really be forcing behaviour onto children that doesn't mesh with the biological make-up of their gender? Moir and Moir (2000, pp103-104) provide an example that supports the presumption that sexual behaviour is biological determined. The case in point describes how the genitals were removed from a young boy after they were "irreparably damaged during circumcision." The genitals were then refashioned to resemble female genitalia and the young boy was then raised as a girl. ""John" became "Joan""(p103). Despite being raised as a girl and being encouraged to

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