Storm of Steel Paper

1286 WordsNov 4, 20136 Pages
Question #1: Should Junger 's Account Be Considered A "Pro" or "Anti" War Book? October 11, 2013 This essay will try to answer the question: should Ernst Junger’s book “Storm of Steel” narrative describing his personal experiences during his service in German Army on Western Front of WW1 be consider anti or pro war? In order to answer this question it is first important to determine the fraises “pro-war” and “anti-war”. The term “pro-war” describes an attitude in which war is desired, necessary or justifiable. The term “anti-war” describes the opposite; war is viewed as immoral and is generally opposed and condemned. This paper will argue that there are grounds in the book to support both proposition.…show more content…
The book is also full of descriptions of the immense destruction cause by war, of description of pain and hardships suffered by ordinary soldiers as well as civilian populations. Referring to a French territory Flanders on which most of the war on the western front had taken place Junger says, “May God permit this splendid country, which has so often in history been a battlefield for warring armies, to rise again from this war with its old quality intact” 7 Junger wishes for the territory to return to the way it was before the war. In doing so he acknowledges the immense destruction that war carries and would prefer if this were not the case. For this reason this statement could easily be considered anti-war. In another place he is talking about the impact the war has on individual soldier, “Sad thoughts are apt to sneak up on the warrior in such locale, when he thinks of those who only recently led their lives in tranquility” 8 This also expresses an anti-war sentiment as he admits to the destruction of other people lives and the impact that it has on him as a soldier. There are many more examples in the book that they are definitely expressing anti-war sentiments. “The state, which relives us of our responsibility, cannot take away our remorse; and we must exercise it. Sorrow, regret, pursued
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