Strategy

6197 Words Sep 2nd, 2012 25 Pages
Introduction

Part A
Economic Regulation

Part B
Ratio Analysis
Decision making techniques

Part C
Benefits and Limitations of Budgeting and Planning SDCCC

Reflection

Appendices
Analysis for Ratio
Sample Income and Expenditure
Balance Sheet
Proposed Monthly Review

Introduction

In 2000 the National Development Plan in Ireland allocated funding to the development of childcare with the specific aim of improving the quality, and increasing childcare provision and places through the introduction of a more coordinated approach. As a result thirty three County Childcare Committees, (CCC) were formed in the Republic of Ireland, each with an agreed set of objectives for the various county/areas. They are
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Part A

Economic Regulation

Background

As previously outlined the Committee has been block funded since its inception in 2002. The budget traditionally has covered core costs i.e. administration and staff costs with a small allocation for actions. Actions are defined primarily by

a) Subsidised training b) Organisation of fully funded workshops on relevant topics c) Monthly network meetings where Service Providers attend to share information

“The quality of economic regulation has a considerable impact on competitiveness and growth. It is critical that Government is capable of responding quickly to changing economic circumstances in a way which is both strategic and reflects the evolving needs of business and of the consumer through ongoing review of regulatory policies and bodies’’.
Source: Government Statement on Economic Regulation 2009.

For public sector managers and not for profit funded by the Government as covered in Nellis and Parker externalities (social costs and social benefits) will be of central concern.

Ireland has a budget deficit of 32 % and its national debt has gone from 25 % of GDP in 2007 to almost 100 per cent in 2010. On 29th of November 2011 it was agreed that EU countries and the International Monetary Fund would provide up to €85bn in total to Ireland, which may be drawn down over a
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