Strides Toward Equality in Major League Baseball Essay

2871 Words12 Pages
Manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, and vice president, Branch Rickey, had always been bothered by the unwritten and unspoken color line in major league baseball. In 1945, he took advantage of his power as manager and called for a meeting with Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, a Negro League team (“About Jackie Robinson”). He had always secretly scouted Negro League teams in hopes of finding the right candidate. One who had enough talent, but also had enough guts to not jeer back at the harsh remarks of racist fans, players, and even coaches (Rubinstein). Rickey was driven to partake in this great experiment because he was bothered by his experience while checking his team into a hotel one night as the varsity baseball coach for…show more content…
Robinson’s talents quickly appealed to white spectators who could not help but support him, regardless of his skin color, as he led their favorite team to a National League Pennant that year (“About Jackie Robinson”). Before Robinson, the last group of African Americans to play on a major league baseball team played in the 1880’s when baseball was not considered “America’s National Pastime” (McDaniels). Robinson’s admission in 1947 was all the more significant in that he was the first to demonstrate the idea of integration in a public way, given baseballs rise in popularity throughout the twentieth century. Robinson’s stellar performances on the field were significant in that those who were spectating were the ones validating his performances. Independent of Robinson’s athletic ability, the fact was that he was given the opportunity to compete with white men, therefore he became a catalyst for other African Americans along with other minorities and those who were otherwise marginalized (McDaniels). Robinson’s performance on the field was a primary demonstration of African Americans athletic ability and ability to persevere (McDaniels). Abbie Weinberg, researcher for The Jackie Robinson Educational Archives, once
Open Document