Stroke: The Fourt Leading Cause of Death in the United States

1519 WordsFeb 19, 20186 Pages
Introduction Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Each year more than 795,000 Americans suffer from a stroke, which means that every forty seconds someone has stroke (Liebman, 2012). Although a stroke can occur at any age, strokes are frequently seen in the older adult demographics. An increase with age doubles the risk for a stroke each decade after 55 (Grysiewicz, 2008). The percentage of stroke survivors to almost fully recover from a stroke is only 10 percent; in contrast, 40 percent of stroke survivors will face moderate to severe impairment which will entail distinctive care (Perlmutter and Colman, 2005). When all strokes are analyzed according to demography of class system, approximately 60% of strokes occur in low or middle income countries (Silverman and Rymer, 2009). Often times, doctors will typically call a stroke a “brain attack” because the events that transpire resemble those that occur during a heart attack (Wang and Aamodt, 2010). Blood supplies a constant source of oxygen to the brain. However, a stroke occurs when that blood supply to any given part of the brain is suddenly ceased. If the blood supply to the brain is suddenly interrupted this leads to the deprivation of oxygen and glucose to that area. The brain cells that are prevented from acquiring these substances, especially oxygen, will be quickly killed off. Strokes can be categorized into two classes: Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes (Lindley, 2008). Stroke
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