Students Should Not Be Special Assistance

933 Words4 Pages
The issue being addressed is whether or not mathematically talented children should receive special assistance due to the belief held by members of the community that these students will do well academically without special programs or assistance from teachers and the school. This issue is a reflection of beliefs about how success in mathematics is achieved, and more broadly reflects the different philosophical views about the purpose of education that are held by educators and members of the community more broadly. The belief that mathematically talented students should receive special assistance is founded in the view that the purpose of education is to support students in achieving their full potential, or to promote academic excellence. On the contrary, the belief that mathematically talented children should not receive special assistance is founded in the view that the purpose of education is to reduce the size of achievement gaps and ensure that all students have equal outcomes, or to promote equity. While there exists an apparent disconnect between these philosophies of education, they are fundamentally linked which ultimately demonstrates that providing mathematically talented children with special assistance is about supporting both academic excellence and about promoting equity. The argument that mathematically talented children should not receive special assistance originates in the view that education is about promoting equity. Providing mathematically talented
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