Sunday in the Park.

998 WordsApr 18, 20084 Pages
The clash of reasonable arguments and brute strength might be a relevant matter in the modern society. Especially if you don’t know exactly how to cope with violent behaviour. Is violence bad or is it just an expression of strength and being a masculine person? In the short story “Sunday in the park” we are presented with the conflict between two men from different social classes. The story shows how different social backgrounds seem to make it impossible for the men to discuss even ridiculously small matters on which they don’t agree. It also shows how hard it can be to judge what’s wrong or right. The story takes place in a park, where a little family are enjoying a peaceful afternoon at the playground. When another boy throws…show more content…
“Stop crying,” she said sharply, “I’m ashamed of you!”” (l. 28-32 p 99) It seems like she’s disappointed of her son, because he’s weak. And it might indicate that she’s also very disappointed of her husband’s behaviour. At first she doesn’t stop him, when he’s about to get into a fight. The reason might be that she somehow wishes him to be strong enough to fight his own battles. (Just like she actually says about the son (l. 5 p. 98)) Of course she doesn’t want her husband to be violent, but on the other hand she doesn’t want to be humiliated in front of strangers either. This theory fits very well with her comment to her husband, when he’s about to vent his frustration on his son. “If you can’t discipline this child, I will” he says, and she answers: “Indeed? You and who else?” In that line she surely – using the words of the bige man - tells him, that she thinks he’s weak. But is he? Maybe he’s just lacking the ability to adapt his behaviour according to his opponents ways of expressing himself. Sometimes it may be hard to figure out if violent behaviour would be the best solution to your problems. If your opponent doesn’t want to understand your arguments, it might be a solution to beat him. But in any case: express your
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