Supporting the Expansion of the Darlington Nuclear Facility

1014 Words Jul 8th, 2018 5 Pages
Expanding the Darlington Nuclear Facility will economically generate larger quantities of emission-free electricity, while conserving land area. First of all, the Darlington Nuclear Facility currently generates roughly 20 per cent of Ontario’s electricity with low operational costs, which can comfortably satisfy a city of 2 million people (Ontario Power Generation Inc., 2013). Expanding the facility will generate even larger quantities of electricity. The Darlington Nuclear Facility has a capacity factor of about 95 per cent (Ontario Power Generation Inc., 2013). Basically, this statistic shows that the reactors in the facility operate at their highest potential 95 per cent of the time. The Darlington Nuclear Facility is able to …show more content…
Renewable energy sources, like hydroelectric, solar, and wind, have proven to be hugely ineffective because they do not generate large enough quantities of electricity (Canadian Nuclear Association, 2013). For instance, a total land area of 40 times the size of Metropolitan Toronto would be needed to generate enough power for the city of Toronto using wind energy (Canadian Nuclear Association, 2013). Moreover, renewable energy sources heavily depend on the weather when generating power. For example, hydroelectric generators require rainfall to flood damns and create flowing water, wind turbines require powerful winds to turn the blades, and solar panels require clear skies and ample amounts of sunshine to produce electricity (Solar Schools, n.d.). Thus, renewable energy sources become unpredictable and inconsistent without these weather conditions.

Second of all, those against the expansion of the Darlington Nuclear Facility claim that it is unsafe for those who work at the facility, the environment, and the people who live in distant municipalities (Revkin, 2013). They feel that the 1986 Chernobyl and 2011 Fukushima nuclear disasters prove that nuclear power plants are unsafe and dangerous (Solar Schools, n.d.). However, Chernobyl and Fukushima experienced meltdowns because their plants were constructed with older designs models (Revkin, 2013). On the other hand, modern designs of nuclear reactors (like the Darlington Nuclear Facility) are less likely to
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