Essay about Sylvia Plath - the Morning Song Analysis

866 WordsJan 18, 20134 Pages
The morning song ‘Morning song’ by Sylvia Plath describes the birth, early stages of childhood and the sentimental value of a child in a very unique way. This poem was wrote from Sylvia Plath’s own experience of child birth, it can also be related to by parents, it could be thought it is aimed mainly at females as this poem is quite feminine. This eighteen line lyrics is structured in 3 line stanzas which are called tersest. It is a tender poem and the overall tone of it is quite mellow. The opening line of the poem ‘love set you going like a fat gold watch,’ this literally means the physical act of making love, and that the act had created the child. The adjective ‘gold’ could signify that her child is precious and very high in value,…show more content…
She also talks about this when she says, ‘a mirror to reflect its own,’ that is to do with reflection and talking about the future as you are your own person. The ‘cloud’ could be the child fleeting away, just like clouds slowly float away. ‘All night your moth breath,’ baby’s breath really softly, it’s almost unnoticeable. She isn’t comparing the child to a moth looks wise, but more of its characteristics like its tiny movements and the fragility of them. The ‘flat pink roses’ is the bed sheet the child is laying on and ‘flickers’ is it’s small moth like movements. The sound of her new born breathing is being compared to a ‘far sea’ moving in her ears, the comparison with nature expresses the beauty of her son. As soon as she hears the child cry she has to get out from bed, she uses the verb ‘stumble’ which could mean that she’s really drained out and tired from giving birth as this may be the first morning after she had her child. She has to get up with her ‘cow-heavy’ breasts which is referring to carrying breast milk. Floral images are mentioned again, she’s wearing a floral Victorian gown; this makes the imagery

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