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Symbols in 'Perelandra' by C.S. Lewis

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Analysis of Symbols and Themes in C.S. Lewis 's

"Perelandra"

British author C.S. Lewis 's "Perelandra" is one of the most religiously relevant fantasy novels ever written. Set on the exotic planet of Perelandra (Venus), it contains within its pages the Creation legend of Adam and Eve, set in our time but in a different world. "Perelandra" is a story of an unspoiled world, the Garden of Eden denied to the residents of earth but still open to the two inhabitants of Perelandra. C.S. Lewis uses this unspoiled planet to retell the biblical creation myth of Adam and Eve. In the book, Maleldil, the supernatural ruler of the Solar System sends the English philologist Ransom to Perelandra. Once there, he finds a world unspoiled by sin, inhabited
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It is within her that the battle for the preservation of this Perelandrian Eden will be fought. Ransom soon learns that this woman is unspoiled by all the sins common to earth, and remains free, young, and innocent. In their conversation, Ransom learns of the one law of the planet told to her by Malendil. Malendil requests that neither the Green Lady nor the King sleep on the fixed land that the floating islands surround. They may enter it, but to sleep on it is against the wishes of Malendil. This is the symbolic forbidden fruit of Perelandria. Sleeping on the fixed land and disobeying Malendil on Perelandria is to eating the apple and disobeying Christ on earth. It is over this that the battle will rage. While exploring the fixed land, the green Lady and Ransom spot a small spacecraft of some sort crash into the ocean nearby. From this, emerges Dr. Weston, who will represent the Devil while on Perelandria. Weston is sent by the Devil to corrupt the planet, and is eventually completely controlled by Satan and left a helpless shell of a man. Dr. Weston immediately makes contact with the Green Lady, begins to try to tempt her into sin.

In "The Screwtape Letters", another book by C.S. Lewis consisting of correspondence between a senior demon and his assistant who is trying to control the soul of a mortal. In it, the senior demon Screwtape writes:

"Jargon, not argument, is
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