Taking Care of the Elderly

4497 WordsNov 30, 201118 Pages
HSA505: Health Services Planning and Marketing Taking Care of the Elderly: Which Options is Best for Your Loved One or Family Member December 13, 2009 Table of Contents Introduction…………………………………………………………… 3 Nursing Home Care………………………………………………….. 7 Adult Daycare…………………………………………………………. 10 Home Health and Hospice…………………………………………... 11 Conclusion……………………………………………………………. 16 References…………………………………………………………….. 17 Introduction According to the United States Bureau of the Census, as of 1995 there were at least 54 million people who were 55 years old or older and 33.5 million of those were over 65 years old (Mathur & Moschis, 1999). According to the National Alliance for Caregiving, more than 22 million…show more content…
Caregivers who were responsible for both children and parents reported that while children are learning and growing and may become self-sufficient in the future, elderly relatives are usually declining in health and becoming more dependent each day (Baron, 2001). Watching the decline of a loved one, usually a parent, adds additional emotional stress to the stress already felt by what may seem to be a never-ending active schedule. According to studies cited in the Journals of Gerontology (2001), over half of older patients who meet eligibility requirements for nursing home care live at home (Covinsky, Eng, Lui, & Sands, 2001). This translates into an economic value of 196 billion dollars worth of informal health care provided by caregivers yearly. If this were counted as part of the national health care expense, it would increase estimates of total spending by at least 20 percent if not more (Covinsky, et al, 2001). Unfortunately, other than the peace of mind that they may have for keeping their family at home, caregivers are not compensated for their time or financial sacrifices, and as referred to above, often penalized by their employers for taking time off to care for their parents (Kossek, 2001). It has been estimated that the unpaid labor, lost wages, and missed opportunities for caregivers is equivalent to approximately $4.8 billion per year (Singleton, 2000). These remain hidden costs in the ongoing dialogue regarding care of the elderly in this
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