Taking a Look at Southwest Airlines

2977 WordsJun 21, 201812 Pages
Introduction Every entrepreneur would have once in for a while had tumbled upon the success story of ‘The Southwest Airlines’. The founder, Herb Kelleher in one of his interviews to CNBC mentions that there were key moments in the history of the airline where things could have gone horribly wrong, but he came up with out-of-the-box solutions that not only saved his business, but made it thrive. When Southwest started in 1971 they were just a small regional carrier flying from Houston to Dallas. But to make themselves unique, they selected beautiful flight attendants with unique personalities and then put them in hot pants and go-go boots. They made some exceptional non-traditional choices while operating in a very traditional industry.…show more content…
Therefore, it's fitting that we began service to San Antonio and Houston from Love Field in Dallas on June 18, 1971. As our Company and Customers grew, our LUV grew too! With the prettiest Flight Attendants serving "Love Bites" on our planes, and determined Employees issuing tickets from our "Love Machines," we changed the face of the airline industry throughout the 1970s. Then in 1977, our stock was listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol "LUV." Over the ensuing years, our LUV has spread from coast to coast and border to border thanks to our hardworking Employees and their LUV for Customer Service. Mission Statement Swot analysis STRENGTHS Southwest has traditionally been a low-cost carrier, which is how they were able to establish a foothold in the market. They tend to operate point-to-point routes, rather than the traditional hub-and-spoke strategy of the legacy airlines, which allows more flexibility in selecting profitable routes. Furthermore, they tend to rely on secondary airports in larger cities, such as Midway (rather than O’Hare in Chicago) and LaGuardia (rather than JFK in New York) to improve on-time reliability, an important aspect of customer relations. Southwest has always aimed for 20 minute turnarounds at the gate – another perennial feature of its touted
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