Teacher Collaboration

2609 WordsMar 15, 201111 Pages
Improvement of Curriculum and Instruction: Curricular Models for Student Success by Robert D. Cummings [Collaboration for Improvement of Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 5535] March, 2011 Address: 3131 Cane Mill Rd. City, State, Zip: Albany, Ga. 31721 Phone: 478-225-6233 E-mail: mike109@yahoo.com Instructor: Ron Dougall Abstract The purpose of this project is that I continue to promote an effective professional learning curriculum for my students, so that they will continue to improve their enduring understanding of strategies and concepts that I implement to help improve learning. The prospect of having these teaching communities for my students will keep them active and involved in classroom, and they…show more content…
In order for any type of setting to operate with limited chaos it is important to establish rules, procedures, and boundaries. Society requires rules and laws and school settings are not exempt. It is imperative that in establishing rules and procedures guidelines are precise and understandable. My plan for establishing rules and procedures include ensuring that all rules and procedures are visually posted in my classroom. Research has shown that visual aids and the sight perception of rules to be taught to students are more likely to be retained if they are posted in the classroom setting. I will also ensure that rules and procedures are taught for longevity beginning the first day of school to ensure consistency in my students practicing them. I will ensure that I solicit my student’s opinions of rules and procedures that should be included in the behavioral norms and expectations of my class. Students seem to believe in the importance and want to abide by rules if they are included in the creation. Effective professional learning is not what most teachers are currently experiencing and in general, it is neither systematic nor strategic. According to Corcoran (1995), professional learning in the United States has typically consisted of workshops or lectures, full day or half-day, sponsored by schools or districts several times a year. These experiences are supplemented by the limited participation of
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