Essay about Television Censorship

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Television Censorship


WHAT IS CENSORSHIP?

"Censorship is the supervision and control of the information and ideas
that are circulated among the people within a society. In modern times,
censorship refers to the examination of books, periodicals, plays, films,
television and radio programs, news reports, and other communication media for
the purpose of altering or suppressing parts thought to be objectionable or
offensive. The objectionable material may be considered immoral or obscene,
heretical or blasphemous, seditious or treasonable, or injurious to the national
security. Thus, the rationale for censorship is that it is necessary for the
protection of three basic social institutions: the family, the church, and the
state.
Censorship
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In another incident a teen-aged boy was killed and two others seriously
injured while lying down along the centerline of a highway. The boys were
imitating a scene from the movie The Program. The accident and the publicity
that followed prompted Touchstone films to remove the scene from the movie, but
leaving many other violent scenes, including one in which a student purposely
smashes his head through a car window (Microsoft Internet Explorer).
I also believe that not only children but perhaps an "impressionable
adult" for whatever reason could feel moved to commit these same acts of
violence that are portrayed on uncensored movies and television. Many of these
movies contain countless instances of torture and unnatural suffering, mass
killings and ethnic persecution. Some of these same crimes are being committed
as we speak by minors and adults all over the world. Who is to say that people
are not influenced by viewing a movie that lacked proper censorship?

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE GUIDELINES THAT GOVERN TELEVISION CENSORSHIP?

FILM INDUSTRY GUIDELINES

"One US industry, the film industry has for many years practiced a form
of self-censorship. In the 1920's, responding to public demands for strong
controls, the Motion Picture Association of America imposed on its constituents
a Production Act; compliance with its standards gave a movie a seal of approval.
A system of film classification was begun in 1968 and has been…