Tension in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee Essay

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Explore how Harper Lee creates tension In the book - To Kill A
Mocking Bird -.

Explore how Harper Lee creates tension

In the book "To Kill A Mocking Bird", Harper Lee creates tension in many different ways. You can especially recognise this build up of tension in Chapter twenty-eight onwards (pages 280-282 and 285-290).
Harper Lee has also created tension in Chapter six (page 55), when Jem gets his trousers caught in the fence of the Radley place and in
Chapter fifteen (page 166) where the incident by the jail with
Atticus, Tom Robinson and the gentlemen takes place.

The first example of when Harper Lee creates tension would be in
Chapter six (page 55). In this chapter we see how the build up of tension keeps the reader
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Also Scout addresses the shadow as "it". This again gives the reader the sense of mystery and fear, as we normally associate animals or monsters/ghosts with "it".

After that, the pace quickens in the chapter and the feeling of panic and confusion grips the reader and keeps them reading on. Eventually, the humour of Miss Stephanie Crawford's "white nigger" joke and her questioning Jem of his absence of pants break this atmosphere of tension, panic, fear etc.

The second example of when Harper Lee creates tension would be on page
166 (part of Chapter fifteen) when the people protesting against
Atticus (for defending Tom Robinson) came forward to the jail.

Firstly she describes the jail by writing about the unusual "solitary" light, which was on. Her choice of "solitary", as an adjective, gives us the feeling of isolation. Then Harper Lee goes on to describe the arrival of these people in such a way to give them a sense of authority and power: "four dusty cars came in from the Meridian highway, moving slowly in a line". She also writes about how the "shadows became a substance" and the way the men talked: "in near whispers", giving us a sense of fear and suspicion.

Then Harper Lee goes on to describe the men themselves. This part
(when I first read it),

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