The Adventure of the Retired Colourman

4041 WordsJun 18, 200817 Pages
Synopsis: The short story “The Adventure of the Retired Colourman” by Arthur Conan Doyle is one of the stories of the Case Book of Sherlock Holmes. One of the characters named Sherlock Holmes in this story is investigating on a missing case. He is hired by an old retired man, Josiah Amberley, to investigate about his wife’s missing with a neighbor, Dr. Ray Ernest. Mr. Josiah also claims that two people are missing along with his cash and securities and therefore he wants to catch both of them. Holmes gives this case to Dr. Watson to handle and find as much as evidences for this case. Holmes gives this case to Dr. Watson because he is busy with other cases and therefore he does not have enough time to take care of this case. Dr. Watson…show more content…
Dr. Ernest is a victim of the story as well. Mr. Barker is another investigator who is hired by Dr. Ernest’s family to investigate on a missing case. Inspector MacKinnon is a police officer who comes in to play at the end of the story and gets credit for the investigation. Credibility and Authority: Among the all the characters Sherlock Holmes, Inspector MacKinnon and Mr. Barker has credibility. Credibility is a capable of being believed; believable; a credible statement. Sherlock Holmes’ credulity is his experiences of investigating and well known by majority of people. "He took me into his dingy sanctum, and we had a long chat. Of course, he was disappointed that you had not come yourself. 'I hardly expected,' he said, 'that so humble an individual as myself, especially after my heavy financial loss, could obtain the complete attention of so famous a man as Mr. Sherlock Holmes.' Another person who had a credibility among others is inspector MacKinnon. The remarkable acumen by which Inspector MacKinnon deduced from the smell of paint that some other smell, that of gas, for example, might be concealed; the bold deduction that the strong-room might also be the death-chamber, and the subsequent inquiry which led to the discovery of the bodies in a disused well, cleverly concealed by a dog-kennel, should live in the history of crime as a standing example of the intelligence of our professional detectives. Even though Holmes and Dr. Watson mostly
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