The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

1186 WordsApr 17, 20155 Pages
“To succeed in life, you need two things; ignorance and confidence.” Mark Twain’s idea here is if no ignorance exists in the world, then there is nothing to learn from, nothing to make better, and nothing to balance society. His most well-known book includes both ignorance and confidence. Although the confidence mentioned contains little effort to succeed. The world continues to learn from its mistakes and thrives from the solution only to improve even further. In Mark Twain’s novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, three meaningful subjects are explored in, education, appearance and reality, and friendship that are still relevant today while also throughout one’s existence. The idea of education in the modern era could not have been so important without the failures of education’s past. Twain makes it clear in Huck Finn that education used to be a sparse concept in the 1800s. “What 's the use you learning to do right, when it 's troublesome to do right and ain 't no trouble to do wrong, and the wages is just the same?” (Twain136) Basically, without learning, doing the wrong thing will seem right. Education is valued today as an important factor of life. Today, without the proper education, one may lead a life with nothing to work from and nothing to earn an income with. Education is a necessity in today’s world because without it, a successful future as your dream profession flies out the window before a person reaches an adult age even. Mark Twain continues to show
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