The Allison J. Pugh 's ' The Tumbleweed Society '

1373 WordsApr 13, 20176 Pages
The Tumbleweed Society Analysis The novel, The Tumbleweed Society, written by Allison J. Pugh, was published on January 9, 2015 by Chicago Book Addict. In this book, Pugh sits down and has conversations with adults from different working classes and economic stances; lower class, middle class, and upper-class. These adults give insight from their individual lives by telling different stories emphasizing struggles in three main areas; home life, work life, and relationships. Pugh truthfully reveals the different worlds people live in and what everyone in different social classes must endure. The job insecurity and the uncertainty of everything else that haunts these people’s lives also have a huge impact on their development as people and…show more content…
His stances both at work and at home were pragmatic. Ed states, “I see that as being responsible, because obviously nowadays I feel if you take care of your employees then they are going to take care of you” (Pugh 138). On the other hand, the insecure workers did not believe that they owe their work-force much at all. When asked what she believed she owed her employer’s, a white woman in the book named Vicky stated, “I guess just respect and appreciation” (Pugh 19). That is all she believed she owed after working for them because she was an insecure worker and was not expecting much from them. Pugh wanted to understand the obligations people believe they have for others in the work-force because she believed that the employer in a job plays an important role in insecurity of these people at work. One of the many concepts that Pugh brought up throughout the book was the different stances people take while at home and at work. These stances were independence, duty, and pragmatism. The independence stance is shown from people by having low expectations of constancy and low capacity of compromise. The duty stance is shown from people by having high expectations of constancy and low capacity of compromise. Lastly, the pragmatism stance is shown from people by having high expectations of constancy and high capacity of compromise. Some people interviewed throughout the book, like Ed, the firefighter, stated, “work is kind of like a marriage, you kind of give a little

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