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The American Association Of University Women

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Throughout the history of the world, discrimination in all forms has been a constant battle; whether its race, gender, religion, beliefs, appearance or anything else that makes one person different from another, it’s happening every day. One significant discrimination problem the world population is battling, takes place in the work place. Women, who are as equally trained and educated, and with the same experience as men are not getting equal pay, “The American Association of University Women is releasing a new study that shows when men and women attend the same kind of college, pick the same major and accept the same kind of job, on average, the woman will still earn 82 cents to every dollar that a man earns” (Coleman). This form of…show more content…
An article titled, Equal Work for Equal Pay: Not Even College Helps Women, was written by Korva Coleman; who claims that women are worth less than men when entering the workforce after completing a college degree. Throughout the article, Coleman supports her claim using different studies’ results that “show when men and women attend the same kind of college, pick the same major and accept the same kind of job, on average, the woman will still earn 82 cents to every dollar that a man earns” (Coleman). Coleman also points out that women tend to pick lower salary jobs but regardless men are still paid more. Coleman relates some pretty inexplicable statistics, which were crucial in supporting her claim: “… found that in teaching, female college graduates earned 89 percent of what men did. In business, women earned 86 percent compared to men. In sales occupations, women earned 77 percent of what men took home.” Coleman proved her claim when arguing that women are paid less than men.

Doing further investigation, a research article titled, How Can Women Escape the Compensation Negotiation Dilemma? Relational Accounts Are One Answer, came up in the publication of The Society for the Psychology of Women. It posited an “easy solution” to the gender pay gap problem and actually tested
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