The American Civil War Is No Exception

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Every war has at least one pivotal point that begs the question, “What if this event had happened differently?” The American Civil War is no exception. Many Southerners made claims that the winning of the Battle of Shiloh could have won the entire war for the Confederacy. Because they lost, however, debate is still had about who is really to blame for the failure at Shiloh. Many try to pinpoint the blame to one specific factor whether that be the leadership under General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard following General Albert Sidney Johnston’s death, the intel that was far below par, or the equipment the Confederate soldiers had to use. In reality, it was a combination between all these factors that would seal the Confederates’ fate.…show more content…
On April 3, Gen. Johnston mobilized his troops and marched towards Pittsburg Landing where they arrived on April 6 because of road and whether conditions. At 5:00 AM, Johnston launched a surprise attack on the unsuspecting Union camps. Because the divisions that had little to no experience were in the area where the attack was first made, the Confederates quickly broke through many Union lines successfully and wreaked havoc. They stormed the camps and slaughtered many of these men in their tents. The Union forces were pushed back at their flanks. One line, however, stood firm against the Confederate onslaught. General Benjamin M. Prentiss held his line and did not allow the Confederates to break through while fighting in a sunken road that is estimated to be about 3 feet deep in what is known as the “The Hornet’s Nest” while waiting for reinforcements. By the end of the first day of fighting, it seemed clear that the Confederates dominated the North by inflicting a high number of casualties and had nearly wiped out Grant’s entire force. The South suffered an even more monumental blow that day in the death of General Albert Sidney Johnston. Johnston was fatally shot in the leg just outside the “Hornet’s Nest” and bled to death shortly thereafter. As a four-star general, he is still the highest ranking officer killed in
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