The American Dream And The Trouble With Diversity By Walter Benn Michaels

2068 Words9 Pages
In the last few decades, the American have become proud of the American Dream, which they believe in coming true, as one working hard now will have a glossy life in the future. However, there is a wonder whether the American is living in the American Dream while the inequality still exists in American society. To get the answer, there are two helpful articles: “What Ever Happened to Upward Mobility?” by Rana Foroohar and “The Trouble with Diversity” by Walter Benn Michaels. These articles talk about and give the ideas to solve that wonder in different ways. In his article, Michaels shows economic inequality has the common factors as the racism in somehow, and now it becomes more popular. He says the difference between the rich and the…show more content…
By giving the European nations’ experiences in solving the unemployed problem, Foroohar hopes American mobility can be improved, and American Dream can come true. Although both Michaels and Foroohar identify the effect of classism and economic inequality to the American Dream in society, Michaels sees the inequality most through the culture and historical point of view, meanwhile, Foroohar stands on the statistics side and social experiences to talk about that. Both articles achieve their targets by showing the classism and economic inequalities exist conspicuous, and the American Dream is limited, especially for the poor and lower class. Although Michaels and Foroohar both talk about the gap between the rich and the poor in the socioeconomic ladder, they expand different thoughts, which have relative. Michaels shares the morals and attitudes are needed between person and person. That is the basic standard of human being, and nothing else is matter. Meanwhile, Foroohar gives a comparison Europe and America in social mobility, and relationship of inequality and mobility. In fact, nobody wishes or wants to be poor. Nobody wants to show up their classes either, even rich nor not. “The class we like is the middle class,” Michaels says (4). He asks for the respect to the poor, and he appreciates the efforts to succeed from them, “while the gap between the rich and the poor has grown larger, we 've been urged to respect people 's identities…
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