The American Dream

1844 Words Mar 13th, 2016 8 Pages
When the concept of the American Dream emerged in the 1930s, it possessed a uniform definition among the people. They believed that one could accomplish to their fullest ability as long as they put forth the effort. In the time of the Great Depression, people wanted to be happy and maintain financial stability for their family. Happiness also included fitting in with the standards set by society. This meant having the stereotypical family with a father, mother, and two children and living in a nice home in a suburban neighborhood. As society has evolved, the meaning of the American Dream has distorted into something else, but the underlying goal to live a happy life has remained the same. This is caused by the change in values, as well as the societal norms and expectations that are set today. People now feel as if they are entitled or expected to live a grandiose lifestyle and assume that it should be acquired easily. This new concept of the American Dream is met with disappointment because it is nearly impossible to reach, resulting in them concluding and claiming that the American Dream is unattainable. The new Dream is an unrealistic standard set on society that is counterintuitive as it prevents people from their main goal of a happy life. Meanwhile, the original aspect of the Dream still exists among some people and is still realistic, but now it is not as easy to achieve as it was back then. Over the decades, consumerism has become a huge influence and part of life…
Open Document