The American Renaissance Essay

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The American Renaissance period, circa 1876-1917, heralded a new sense of nationalism with a pride linking to a spirit akin to Greek democracy, the rule of Roman law, and a cultural and educational reform movement often referred to as Renaissance humanism. This American nationalism focused on the expression of modernism, technology, and academic classicism. Renaissance technological advancements include wire cables supporting the Brooklyn Bridge in the State of New York, along with cultural advancements found in the Prairie School houses, Beaux-Arts Institute of Design in architecture and sculpture. The political heir of American nationalism evolved with the Gilded Age and New Imperialism school of thought. The American Renaissance…show more content…
The central key issues addressed women's suffrage, abolitionism, expanstionist philiosphies, such as Manifest Destiny or Mexican and Native American imperialistic conquest, and religious influential roots.

Ralph Waldo Emerson -- Representative Men (1850): A comprehensive overview of the literary masterpiece authored by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Nathaniel Hawthorne -- The Scarlett Letter (1850): An online publication of the controversial literary masterpiece "The Scarlett Letter" authored by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Nathaniel Hawthorne -- The House of Seven Gables (1851): An authoritative resources outlining the biography and works of the Romantic author Nathaniel Hawthorne, including a direct link to an online publication of the avowed "The House of Seven Gables," literary masterpiece.

Henry David Thoreau -- Walden (1854): A thorough a complete study guide to Henry David Thoreau's "Walden," which accounts a two-year account of Thoreau's life at Walden Pond; however, the literary masterpiece does not directly reflect Thoreau's life in the tone of a biography or journalistic narrative.

Walt Whitman -- Leaves of Grass (1855): An annotated project on the American Renaissance masterpiece "Leaves of Grass," authored by Romanticist Walt Whitman.

Herman Melville -- Moby-Dick (1851): A retrospective commentary on the Romantic classic, "Moby-Dick (1851)" authored by Herman Melville.

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