The Anglo-Irish Agreement Essay

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The Anglo-Irish Agreement The Anglo-Irish agreement, 1985, this was agreed between Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Irish Taoiseach Garrett Fitzgerald. Between 1980 and 1984, the British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher held regular meetings with Taoiseach Charles Haughey and then Garrett Fitzgerald. Both governments were concerned about continuing the violence with the IRA and about the increasing support for the IRA’S political wing, Sinn Fein. By 1984, Mrs Thatcher was convinced that any solution would have to involve the Irish republicans. Unionists in Northern Ireland became increasingly concerned during these discussions, but Thatcher ignored their fears. In November …show more content…
Jack Lynch, the then Taoiseach asserted:

The Irish Government can no longer stand by and see innocent people injured and, perhaps, worse. The Irish Government have ... requested the British Government to apply immediately to the United Nations for the urgent dispatch of a peace-keeping force to the six counties of Northern Ireland

The British Government responded that 'Northern Ireland had long been an integral part of the United Kingdom and that events there were an internal matter for the United Kingdom Government' The Stormont Government was prorogued and direct rule from Westminster was established in March 1972. Direct rule was seen as a temporary measure but has continued to this day.

Taken from http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/events/aia/sum.htm "I had come to the conclusion that I must now give priority to heading off the growth of support for the IRA in Northern Ireland by seeking a new understanding with the British Government, even at the expense of my cherished, but for the time being at least clearly unachievable, objective of seeking a solution through negotiations with the Unionists." Garret Fitzgerald in his autobiography All in a Life (Fitzgerald, 1991).

"I started from the need for greater security, which was imperative. If this meant making limited political concession to the South, much as I disliked this kind of bargaining, I had