The Avant Garde Paris Essay examples

1824 Words 8 Pages
Paris today is known as a center of arts and rich culture both acclaimed and original. Famous moments pop up through the history of France’s art, such as the impressionistic artworks by Monet, the École des Beaux-Arts teachings of classicism, and the iconic Eiffel Tower by Stephen Sauvestre. Paris augments itself with numerous museums to catalog countless masterpieces and sculptures throughout France’s enduring, yet sometimes gritty, history. As a whole, Paris comprises of a mixture between historic architectural themes like rusticated brick clad, mansard roofs, striated columns, and a modern day architectural themes like engineered metalwork, and external program support machinery. The notion of classic French architecture, juxtaposed …show more content…
The Louvre was not founded as a museum, and the road to attaining today’s program expanded across six centuries of monarchies, wars, treaties, and revolution. Dating far back to the 12th century as a fortress for King Phillip II, the Louvre laid foundations with protective walls, and underground crypts to function not as a gallery for the public, but rather a stronghold for the private. As the decades turned, the old Louvre acclimated to the needs of the monarchies, undergoing usage as both a stronghold and a retreat, but entirely defense-based nonetheless (Deitz). Two centuries passed when Charles V altered the program from a bulwark of protection, changing it into a residency. Here the program shifted towards a notion of more public structure. Several French kings after, Francis I decorated the bulky fortress with a French renaissance style, further changing the Louvre’s appearance and adapting the architecture to the art style of the time. This move would be seen again in I. M. Pei’s controversial addition. Under King Henry IV, the Louvre underwent reconstruction (Kostof). During the rise of Versailles, artisans resided within the Louvre’s halls, giving way to the notion of an art influenced program for the building…