The Balance of Dorian Gray's Structure of Personality in Oscar Wilde's Novel the Picture of Dorian Gray: a Study of Psychoanalysis

3463 Words Jun 23rd, 2011 14 Pages
THE BALANCE OF DORIAN GRAY’S STRUCTURE OF PERSONALITY IN OSCAR WILDE’S NOVEL THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY: A STUDY OF PSYCHOANALYSIS

Background of the study
Human lives with their desire though some of their desire are failed to deliver because of the norms border. As a human, we live in a community and it is impossible to do as we please. Norms play the role as law where it limits our behavior and make the standard law points about what we can do or what we cannot do. This law usually opposes our desire. When we choose to follow our desire rather than the norms, our society will see us as a bad person. It is because they belive that life has to be bordered by norms and people cannot do as they please without considering their social
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There are unconsciousness, dreams and symbols, the meaning of sexuality, and the meaning of death. In this study, the writers use tenet stucture of personality, especially id, ego, and super ego.
According to Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic theory of personality, personality is divided into three elements. There are known as the id, the ego and the superego which work together to create human behaviors. Id is completely unconscious part of personality that keep our desires, wishes, and fears. Every people have their id at the time they were born. Ego which is a conscious part of the personality processes experiences and operates as a mediator between the id and superego. Ego is built when people are two to three years old. Superego is a part of personality which act as a moral judgments. Usually, people will build their superego at five years old. If one of these aspects is higher than others, it will lead to an unhealthy personality. The key to a healthy personality is a balance between the id, the ego, and the superego.

The superego is in direct opposition to the id, the psychological reservoir of our instincts, and our libido, or sexual energy. The id is devoted solely to the gratification of prohibited desires of all kinds—desire for power, for sex, for amusement, for food—without an eye to consequences. In other words, the id consists largely of those desires regulated or forbidden by social convention. Thus, the…