The Bay Area Is Associated With A Series Of Water Wars

1119 WordsNov 2, 20155 Pages
Historically, the Tampa Bay area is associated with a series of “water wars.” Although the root of this conflict is not particularly clear. It is speculated that the creation of Pinellas County or an increased demand on a limited resource (water) could be the premise. Regardless of the reason, the political and legal battles over water supply in the Tampa Bay area have left their mark on the region. Rand (2003) elaborates on “the water wars” here, “In the 1970s, Hillsborough and Pinellas [counties] began a bitter feud over where water would come from and where it would go” (p.24). Indeed, water supply development was a fundamental part of this conflict. These “water wars” helped to influence conservation efforts in the Tampa Bay area.…show more content…
Given the substantial population growth in Florida over the past half-century and the continued development of land, water conservation is crucial in the Tampa Bay area and throughout Florida. As of 2010 (see Table 1), the increase in water demand in the Tampa Bay area, from 2005 to 2030, is expected to be 126.9 millions of gallons per day (mgd); approximately 74 percent of this demand (91 mgd) has either been met or will be met by programs that are under development (2010 Regional Water Supply Plan Executive Summary, 2010, p.10). In contrast, as stated in the Draft 2015 Regional Water Supply Plan Executive Summary (see Table 2), the increase in water demand in the Tampa Bay area, from 2010 to 2035, is expected to be 93.4 mgd; approximately 97 percent of this demand (90 mgd) has either been met or will be met by programs that are under development. It is worth noting, this demand could be reduced by 20.34 mgd through reclaimed water and conservation projects that are under development (Draft 2015 Regional Water Supply Plan Executive Summary, 2015, p.12). These water conservation projects include agricultural, non-agricultural, and education projects. Indeed, these projects are implementing both conservation measures and conservation incentives. In Florida, agriculture is the largest consumer of fresh water usage, followed by domestic use, industry/commerce, and recreation irrigation: 40 %, 39 %, 15 %, and 6%, respectively (Marella, 2010, p.10). As stated in the Draft
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