The Between Democracy, Its Processes, And Policing Are Well Established Across A Wide Variety Of Academic Disciplines

1562 WordsApr 25, 20177 Pages
The connections between democracy, its processes, and policing are well established across a wide variety of academic disciplines. Political scientists and economists have developed a literature discussing the various forms police forces take and their positions within certain regime types. Separate from theory regarding democratization and security, like Sklansky’s (2005) work, a great deal of scholarly papers have been written regarding riots and civil disruption. For example, Gunning (1972) focused a good portion of his An Economic Approach to Riot Analysis defining and operationalizing terms and variables necessary for studying riots. Others have written case studies seeking theoretic extrapolation or situational awareness. These…show more content…
Monkkonen (1992) argues that these responsibilities changed in the early twentieth century, when the police began narrowing their focus on crime control. Schweingruber (2000) explores how the advent and adoption of ‘mob sociology’ in policing circles during the 1960s again shifted the nature of police forces, especially in the Western world. At this juncture, mainstream psychology mischaracterized the context of riots, and suggested that police forces adopt enhanced riot control tactics (Schweingruber 2000). Some have argued this trend lead to an escalation of police brutality, and the ‘negotiated settlement’ riot control method was developed as a result (Schweingruber 2000). Hills (1995) provides evidence of this brutality by paramilitary style police forces in the UK during the 1980s. In addition, debate occurs within the literature between proponents of police centralization and critics of national police forces. Some, like those refuted by Berkeley (1970), argue that centralized police forces represent a danger to democratic society and institutions. Berkeley (1970) asserts that traditional scholarship views small governments with decentralized police forces as the least likely opportunity for the abuse of power and commitment of human rights violations. But, like Bayley (1979), Berkeley

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