The Birth Order And Personality

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Birth Order, as in the order a child is born in their family, has been a popular topic for researchers and the general public for decades. Originally it was claimed that personality was determined by birth order and even now there are many stereotypes of the firstborn being mature and driven while the youngest child is often described as wild and rebellious (Bleske-Rechek and Kelley, 2013). Nowadays researchers find birth order and personality are unrelated. Whether or not intelligence is related to birth order is not completely clear as there have been many studies supporting both sides. However, based on the newest research the prevailing attitude is that intelligence is linked with birth order. Last of all an individual’s health seems…show more content…
Furthermore any perceived link would only be visible when an individual is with their family (Bleske-Rechek and Kelley, 2013). Both “Birth order and personality: A within-family test using independent self-reports from both firstborn and later born siblings” and “Examining the effects of birth order on personality” came to the same conclusion. With both study’s results supporting each other it can be said that an individual’s personality is unaffected by the order they are born within their family. Intelligence Intelligence is a fair amount easier to measure on account of IQ (Intelligence quotient) tests. That said many researchers have conducted studies on a possible connection between intelligence and birth order. What studies such as ”Examining the effects of birth order on personality” have found is that firstborns do slightly better on intelligence tests (Rohrer, Egloff, and Schmukle, 2015). To show how slight the effect is ”a randomly picked firstborn had a 52% chance of having a higher IQ than a randomly picked secondborn.” (Rohrer, Egloff, and Schmukle, 2015, pg 14225) IQ tests are not the only way intelligence was measured in terms of linking it to birth order, educational attainment was also used. ”Birth order and educational attainment: evidence from fully adopted sibling groups” focuses on
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