The Blindside By Jon Hancock

999 WordsMar 27, 20174 Pages
The movie "The Blindside" was written by Jon Hancock based on true life events about the Baltimore Ravens NFL player named Michael Oher. Oher was a poor African American teenager, whose mother was a drug addict, and was taken away from his mother as a child. Michael jumped from foster home to foster home. Until one day when his life was going to change for the best. A white family called the Tuohy 's saw the need to take Michael in their home. Leigh Anne and Sean Tuohy sooner became his legal guardians and the story is about how his life improves while playing football at Wingate high school an all-white school in Tennessee. It shows him struggling with his academics, color, appearance, but Michael overcame the fight. With Michael 's…show more content…
Facial expressions are probably the most observed part of the human body when we communicate mentioned in the natural bridges book. In this movie, the second a communication skill that was displayed is intercultural communication. Race plays a vast part of Michael and his new lifestyle. Being that he is African American and his adoptive family is white, both coming from different economic and social classes. When he was seen unfortunately the white community frowned upon him. Especially when Michael arrives at his new school he was not kindly greeted or welcomed. He felt like he didn’t belong there or maybe saw him as a bad person because of her color. Another scene that exemplifies this skill is when Leigh goes looking for Michael in his old hometown where Michaels mother lived. She comes across the thug Alton and is asked if her son Michael was here. He replied and he said, "yeah last night and he better sleep with one eye opened". She proceeds and then Alton called her an awful name and she came back and said, "you threaten me so as the cross into the downtown you will be sorry". As one can see with both examples confirms how the separation of races and cultures played. Mentioned in chapter two perception culture is how one was raised to perceive the world. In this case, the whites and blacks didn 't see eye to eye. Towards the end of the movie, both races appreciated and accepted one another. I believe having Michael there

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