The Book of Exodus is not a narrative of slavery. The Book of Exodus is not a condemnation of

1000 WordsApr 23, 20194 Pages
The Book of Exodus is not a narrative of slavery. The Book of Exodus is not a condemnation of slavery. The Book of Exodus is not an escapee's manual. The Book of Exodus does not even incorporate one journal entry, one trial transcript, or one eye-witness account of the slavery endured by the Israelites in Egypt. Despite its lack of address, the Book of Exodus solidifies man's need for God and God's need for worship. Before returning to Egypt with his purpose at hand, Moses discovers God on Mt. Sinai during a solitary journey with his father-in-law's flock. By bringing Moses to a mountain, God shows Moses that holiness is not a quality known to man; holiness is known only to God. God may reveal holiness to man, as he does to Moses;…show more content…
Immediately thereafter, God introduces Himself, "I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob." (Exodus 3:6) God's relationship to Moses renews generation after generation, from host to host and blessed father to blessed son. Without this continuity, God would be a stranger, or at best a long-lost relative, someone whom Moses would not need and probably would not recognize. Recognition of God's sovereignty is at the heart of worship,--the driving theme of the Book of Exodus,--and the reason God so severely punishes the Egyptians. God does not punish the Egyptians for keeping the Israelites as slaves. God punishes the Egyptians for Pharaoh's attempt to better God by sacrificing His firstborn: Israel. Although many arguments can be made against human sacrifice, none mitigates God's anger with Pharaoh. In general, God's anger is rarely pacified: not even Moses protects the Israelite idol worshipers at Mt. Sinai. At Moses' command, the Levites slay three thousand of their brothers, friends, and neighbors--the innocent along with the guilty. Believing God's wrath has branded them with righteousness, Moses praises the survivors as "blessed." God has other plans: another plague. With the deaths of those who break Faith, God is satisfied. As Supreme Ruler, God defends those who worship Him and destroys those who worship idols. After leading the defeat of the Amalekites at Rephidim, Moses

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