The Cap and Bells and Love Song:I and thou Essay

1803 Words Apr 20th, 2014 8 Pages
Both the poems Love song: I and thou and The Cap and Bells explore different representations of love. Each of the poems, however, present love in very different ways. Where Alan Dugan displays his view on marital love in an unromantic manner within his poem Love song: I and Thou, Yeats' The Cap and Bells differs by showing the readers a view on a romantic or obsessive love which is unlikely to be requited, due to the difference in social rank in their society.

William Butler Yeats' The Cap and Bells depicts the behaviour of love through an account of actions between a jester and a Queen. Through the use of many symbolic references, the characters reflect a lover's actions to his loved one. His use of a jester in love shows us that
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This contrasts with The Cap and Bells, having been based on a dream and written in a typical love poem structure, as a ballad. Dugan cuts through typical sentimentality and his poem instead, is full of mockery.

The speaker of the poem compares his life to a badly built house, using plain, direct and jargon language shown from the very opening, "Nothing is plum, level, or square," and unpleasant similes. He realizes that he could never bring stability in his life. This is understood when he writes, ‘the joints are shaky by nature.’ The shaky nature of the joints is similar to Dugan’s unsteady and insecure life. The words ‘by nature’ briefly imply that he thinks he had no control or ability to stabilize his life and thus free him from blame. His use of technical language throughout Love song: I and Thou could have been the result of Alan Dugan's childhood, being a son of a seller of nuts and bolts. It is shown throughout the poem that, "no piece fits," suggesting that nothing in life is perfect and continues to reveal how discontinuous and incomplete the speaker finds the way he has lived his life. The house seems to be badly built, almost as if it is about to fall apart and this is how Dugan feels about himself.

The speaker of the poem seems to be a protagonist and compares himself to Christ in a playful and comical way. There is repetition of the word,