The Case Morse Vs. Frederick

1269 WordsOct 12, 20166 Pages
In the case Morse Vs. Frederick, a supreme court case that questioned the first amendment, the main argument set out by Frederick was that the school’s principal, Morse, was that Morse violated Fredericks first amendment right. Juneau-Douglas High School was in session during the Olympic Torch Relay for the 2002 winter Olympics. The school decided that it would let its students and faculty out for a short period to watch as the torchbearers passed the school. This was considered a school event and was treated as a field trip. Joseph Frederick was a senior at JDHS. He was a bit late coming to school that day. When Frederick arrived to school during the event, he met up with some of his friends. They soon pulled out fourteen-foot banner that had the phrase: “BONG HiTS 4 JESUS”. The school’s principal, Deborah Morse, almost immediately told the students to take down the banner. All but one student complied with Morse. That student was Joseph Frederick. She told the boys to take the sign down because she believed that the sign was encouraging the use of illegal drugs in school. She told Frederick to report to her office where she later punished him by suspending him for ten days. Frederick believed that his constitutional rights were being denied and that the first amendment was violated in the process. Frederick sued Morse claiming that the school violated his first amendment. Morse explained that she was not violating the first amendment because the school has a school
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